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CS primed for bright 2018 – but don’t take our word for it

No one is surprised these days when College Station gets ranked among the nation’s top college towns, as a great place for business, or as one of the best places to live.

The criteria publications and financial websites use to compile those rankings are usually based on data from the past year. The lists are usually divided into population categories, too.

A website called CardRates.com is different. This week it was bold enough to make predictions about what’s ahead by publishing a list of “10 cities Primed for Economic Growth and Opportunity in 2018.” It included cities as small as 5,178 people (Evansville, Wisc.) to as large as 947,897 (Austin).

By now, you’ve probably guessed that College Station made the list. Why else would we be blogging about it? But you may be surprised that we are ranked No. 1.

That’s right. CardRates says College Station’s economy could be as good as it gets in the entire country in 2018. In developing the list, CardRates took factors such as pay, cost of living and unemployment rates into consideration.

Here’s what they had to say about us:

College Station is located roughly equidistant from Houston and Austin. Although the city has seen a population increase of about 25 percent over the last 10 years, College Station, with fewer than 120,000 residents, is large enough to offer city amenities, while still being small enough to maintain that hometown feel.

College Station’s unemployment rate is well below the national average at 2.7 percent, the lowest among the cities on our list, and the median household income has grown more than 80 percent since 2000. The city’s largest employer is Texas A&M University, which has its main campus in College Station, and is nationally recognized as a Land-, Sea-, and Space-Grant Institution.

Here’s the full list:

We already knew we were doing pretty well, but it’s nice – and a bit exciting – to know others feel the same way.

 

College Station-Bryan among nation’s best for job growth

College Station-Bryan hits the list at no. 5.

The full story from Governing.com is at this link, but a key excerpt is:

Many of the hardest-hit regions over the decade, such as Rockford and Binghamton, are either manufacturing centers or home to a single industry. By contrast, regions with the top employment gains were college towns or those supported by tech or energy firms. 

Largest Metro Job Losses Top Job Growth Rates
Atlantic City-Hammonton, NJ -10.7% Austin-Round Rock, TX 31.9%
Binghamton, NY -8.6% Provo-Orem, UT 30.8%
Shreveport-Bossier City, LA -8.0% Greeley, CO 25.5%
Lafayette, LA -7.2% Lake Charles, LA 24.2%
Rockford, IL -6.8% College Station-Bryan, TX 23.3%
Peoria, IL -6.8% Nashville-Davidson, TN 23.2%
Fort Smith, AR-OK -6.6% Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, AR-MO 23.1%
Hickory-Lenoir-Morganton, NC -6.3% Fort Collins, CO 22.8%
Huntington-Ashland, WV-KY-OH -6.0% San Antonio-New Braunfels, TX 22.7%
Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, OH-PA -6.0% Fargo, ND-MN 20.3%