Podcast: Is This A Thing? Krispy Kreme, Lululemon and Spice World

Episode 8 of “Is This A Thing?” finds College Station Economic Development Director Natalie Ruiz talking about the status of some restaurants and businesses you’ve heard about for a while, plus new trends that are showing interest in College Station, such as “entertainment uses.”

Listen to the Podcast: Is This A Thing? Krispy Kreme, Lululemon and Spice World

Podcast: Jones Crossing H-E-B built for technology – and pizza

H-E-B’s newest store in College Station is set to open Sept. 12, and there will be striking differences when compared to locations at Holleman Drive and at Tower Point.

In this edition of the podcast, H-E-B Area Community Coordinator Diane Besosa talks about everything from app-based shopping/checkout to the restaurant that will be located inside.

Listen to the Podcast: Jones Crossing H-E-B built for technology – and pizza

 

College Station named the most educated city in Texas

College Station has been identified as Texas’ most educated city by Insurify.

Insurify analyzed more than 1.4 million auto insurance applications that indicated the age and education history of each applicant. Within the data set, each was assigned a score based on educational attainment and, for current students, grade point average (GPA). The results were then grouped by city, and the highest scoring communities in each state were identified.

“Across America, educational success is a vital factor in determining the advancement of a local economy,” said Snejina Zacharia, Insurify’s CEO. “These awards recognize the communities in each state whose residents demonstrate an unmatched commitment to their education.”

Read the Full Story: Most Educated Cities in America

Texas is CNBC’s Top State for Business

From CNBC:

Riding the rising tide of energy prices—and the job growth that goes with it—Texas claims the top spot in CNBC’s 2018 America’s Top States for Business rankings.

This is familiar territory for the Lone Star State, which becomes the first four-time winner in our annual study, now in its 12th year. But it has been a long time coming. This is the first time since 2012 that Texas has claimed top honors. Not coincidentally, West Texas Intermediate Crude Oil—the state’s most important export—peaked at just over $108 per barrel that year, a figure it has not seen since. But it has risen enough—around 60 percent in the last year, powering through the $70 per barrel mark in June—to turbocharge the $1.6 trillion Texas economy.

Read the rest of the story: Texas is CNBC’s Top State for Business in America this year

College Station remains among U.S. cities adding the most jobs

By Jacob Passy, Morningstar

A boom in certain industries means that some parts of the country are seeing remarkable job growth.

Attention job-seekers: Midland, Texas, is hiring.

The Western Texas city, which is home to 136,000 people, has experienced the largest percentage growth in jobs over the past year of any metropolitan area in the country, according to May data released last week by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The number of people employed in Midland has jumped by more than 11% over the past year, well above the job growth rate nationwide (http://www.marketwatch.com/story/us-adds-healthy-213000-jobs-in-june-but-unemployment-rate-backs-up-to-4-2018-07-06).

The U.S. added 213,000 jobs in June, but the unemployment rate rose to 4% last month nationwide after dropping to an 18-year low of 3.8% in May, the Labor Department said Friday.

Nearby Odessa, Texas, wasn’t too far behind — the number of jobs there has risen 4.4% since May 2017. Both cities have a single industry to thank for their employment growth: Oil. The Midland-Odessa region is the heart of Texas’ petroleum industry, and the rising price of crude oil has certainly benefitted these cities though recent price declines could spell trouble.

College towns are also job magnets. Lafayette-West Lafayette, Ind., home of Purdue University, and College Station, Texas, home of Texas A&M University, ranked among the top cities nationwide for job growth over the past year.

Metropolitan area  Jobs in May 2017 (thousands)  Jobs in May 2018 (thousands)  Year-over-year change 
Midland, Texas                            92.4                         102.8                  11.3% 
Ocean City, N.J.                          43.1                          46.3                   7.4% 
Lafayette-West Lafayette, Ind.            99.5                         106.5                   7.0% 
Elkhart-Goshen, Ind.                     137.2                         145.3                   5.9% 
Walla Walla, Wash.                        27.9                          29.5                   5.7% 
Crestview-Fort Walton Beach-Destin, Fla. 114.6                         119.7                   4.5% 
Gainesville, Ga.                          89.5                          93.5                   4.5% 
College Station-Bryan, Texas             116.6                         121.9                   4.5% 
Odessa, Texas                             72.7                          75.9                   4.4% 
St. George, Utah                          64.2                            67                   4.4% 
Yakima, Wash.                             87.3                          91.1                   4.4%

Such a trend isn’t unique to the oil industry or West Texas though. Domestic travel has increased in recent years — and the expanded tourism revenue has translated into impressive job growth for many cities across the country.

In Indiana’s Elkhart-Goshen metropolitan area, the number of jobs has increased 5.9% over the past year. The city is host to the country’s two largest manufacturers of recreational vehicles — Thor Industries (THO) and Forest River (BRKA). The RV industry has seen shipments of new vehicles spike 12% over the past year, according to the RV Industry Association.

Tourism also enriched the fortunes for the job markets in other cities, including St. George, Utah, a suburb of Las Vegas, Ocean City, N.J., and Destin, Fla.

Original Story: UPDATE: As job growth continues, these cities have added the most jobs

College Station best places in Texas to live on a fixed income

GoBankingRates.com has rated College Station as the best city in Texas to live in on a fixed income:

College Station’s relatively low housing costs could be beneficial to someone on a fixed income. Home values crept up by about 2 percent year over year, while rents got cheaper.

Best Places in Every State to Live on a Fixed Income

Podcast: How the At Home deal was sealed

Home decor superstore At Home has announced it will occupy the property that was formerly Gander Mountain on Earl Rudder Freeway in College Station. That’s great news for consumers, but also for those in the economic development business since empty box stores along a major highway is not the image you prefer.

 

On this edition of Is This A Thing?, College Station’s Economic Development Director Natalie Ruiz and Oldham Goodwin Group EVP Clint Oldham talk about how the At Home deal came about, how fragile this deal – and all eco-devo deals, to be honest – really was, and how retail attitudes are no longer cowering from The Amazon Effect.

 

 

At Home superstore moving into old Gander Mountain building

A new business is moving into the old Gander Mountain building on Highway 6 in College Station.

At Home is a big box retail chain specializing in home decor products based in Plano.

Formerly known as Garden Ridge, the specialty stores carry more than 50,000 unique items across broad product categories including furniture, garden, home textiles, housewares, patio, rugs, seasonal decor, tabletop decor, and wall decor.

Read the full KBTX Story

College Station named one of America’s top places for small business

Small businesses thrive across America, but some towns are just perfect for a growing business. Topmanagementdegrees.com looked at all the cities in America with between 100,000 and 250,000 residents and ranked them on just how small business friendly they can be. College Station checked in at No. 15 on this list.

The 50 best towns for small business in America

Local unemployment rate falls to 2.7 percent in April

May 18, 2018

AUSTIN ⎯ The Texas economy added 39,600 seasonally adjusted nonfarm jobs in April, which marked 22 consecutive months of employment growth. Over the year, Texas added 332,300 jobs for an annual employment growth rate of 2.7 percent in April. Private sector employers added 37,900 positions over the month. Texas’ seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 4.1 percent in April, up slightly from 4.0 percent in March.

Midland Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) recorded the month’s lowest unemployment rate among Texas MSAs with a non-seasonally adjusted rate of 2.1 percent, followed by the Amarillo MSA, which had the second lowest with a rate of 2.6 percent. The College Station-Bryan MSA recorded the third lowest rate of 2.7 percent for April.

“Texas employers continue to boost the impressive Texas economy by adding 39,600 jobs in April and 332,300 jobs over the year,” said TWC Chairman Andres Alcantar. “Our state’s ongoing trajectory of success is linked to the innovation and competitiveness of employers in a range of industries providing workers more opportunities to demonstrate their world-class skills.”

The Manufacturing Industry recorded the largest private-industry employment gain over the month with 8,600 jobs added. Professional and Business Services employment grew by 7,500 jobs in April, followed by Education and Health Services with 6,200 jobs.

“Texas employers added 327,500 jobs over the past year, making our state’s annual private-sector employment growth 3.2 percent for April, up from 2.9 percent in March,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Employers Ruth R. Hughs. “It’s no surprise that CEOs ranked the Lone Star State as the Best State for Business for the 14th consecutive year in a row. These numbers are a testament to the perseverance and resilience of our Texas employers and the diversity of our Texas economy.”

“The Texas labor force is now approaching 14 million and has continued to provide employers with the skills and expertise needed to keep the Texas economy growing,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Labor Julian Alvarez. “TWC and the 28 local workforce development boards are committed to connecting Texas workers with available jobs.”

Audio downloads with comments from Commissioner Hughs on the latest labor market data are available on the TWC website press release page. Employment estimates released by TWC are produced in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics. All estimates are subject to revision. To access this and more employment data, visit tracer2.com.